Fish curry with coconut and lemon grass

From Cookipedia


Fish curry with coconut and lemon grass
Fish curry with coconut and lemon grass
Servings:Serves 4
Calories per serving:1078
Ready in:1 hour, 5 minutes
Prep. time:30 minutes
Cook time:35 minutes
Difficulty:Average difficulty
Recipe author:JuliaBalbilla
First published:15th June 2014
Simmering in the wok

This spicy fish curry with a Malaysian influence would probably be cooked using rather expensive monkfish. We are now converted lovers of basa so I thought I would try using that instead.

If you can get galangal, do give it a try, it is one of the oddest spices that I've ever tried. I've not yet decided on its flavour, but the perfume is similar to a very sweet bubble-gum, though its many decades since I've tried bubble-gum!

Do try this, whatever fish or spices you decide to use!


Ingredients

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Method

  1. Chop the fish into large bite-sized chunks and if not using basa, remove any skin and bones.
  2. Season the fish with a good pinch of salt and half of the citrus zest and juice.
  3. Using a dry wok, brown the coconut flesh, turning it regularly.
  4. Add the vegetable oil, ginger and galangal, chillies, garlic, lemon grass and fry for a few minutes.Add the nam pla to the tin of coconut milk and add the coconut milk to the wok by straining through a fine sieve. Reserve the strained cream to add later.
  5. Add the turmeric powder and the chicken stock together with the remaining citrus juice and zest.
  6. Taste and season with salt and black pepper if needed.
  7. Bring to a gentle boil and simmer for 10 minutes.
  8. Add the fish and simmer for another 8 minutes.
  9. Remove from the heat and stir in the sieved coconut cream.

Serving suggestions

Serve with plain basmati rice and garnish with freshly chopped coriander

Variations

Use any firm fleshed white fish or even king prawns. I think that this recipe would work just as well using chicken instead of fish.

I will try this with next with chicken thighs and chicken drumsticks.

Chef's notes

I used 2 Indian green chillies and one similarly sized red chili, finely chopped, seeds not removed, and the heat was perfect. We would normally serve this with rice, but we had just been gifted some freshly dug new potatoes which actually went really well with this. Great for soaking up all that lovely gravy!

Peeling ginger

There is no need to peel ginger. As a result of attending a Thai cookery demo, we have learnt that peeling ginger is unnecessary unless for aesthetic purposes as the skin is high in fibre and full of flavour. However, do remove any bits that have become tough or woody.

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