Pachamanca in olla

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Pachamanca in olla
Pachamanca in olla
Pachamanca being cooked traditionally
Servings:Serves 8
Calories per serving:1457
Ready in:6 hours
Prep. time:5 hours
Cook time:1 hour
Difficulty:Average difficulty
Recipe author:JuliaBalbilla
First published:31st October 2012
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Pachamanca is the Quechua language word for a traditional Andean cooking technique, in which vegetables and meats are placed underground with very hot stones and slowly roasted. ("Pacha" means "earth", and "manca" means "pot" in Quechua). To prepare it you need some open space. When you don't have it, you can prepare pachamanca in olla. It is cooked over the fire in a clay pot.

Note: for the pachamanca - you can have one meat, two meats, or more!!!

meats

Ingredients

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marinade mixture (2 cups)

tubers, legumes and corn

garnish

Method

  1. Blend all of the ingredients for the marinade. Pour over meats and marinate for 4 hours.
  2. Soak the fava beans, tubers, and corn in water for 1 hour.
  3. Place a layer of corn husks in the bottom of the pot.
  4. Place the marinated meats over the layer of corn husks, and then cover with a layer of potatoes, sweet potatoes and corn. Place a second layer of meats on top and continue layering the potatoes, corn and finally the fava beans.
  5. Cover the pot tightly and cook over a high flame for 35 minutes. Remove the clay pots from the stove and let the pachamanca rest for another 10 minutes.
  6. Serve with Ají Amarillo Paste or with Salsa criolla

Chef's notes

JuliaBalbilla has kindly done the following research into UK equivalents for some of the more difficult to obtain ingredients in this recipe. Thank you Julia!

  • Huacatay is a type of marigold and seeds can be obtained from: Chiltern Seeds. Looks like they kill off weeds as well!
  • Chicha de Jora is a bit trickier as it is a drink made from corn. There is a recipe for making it here , but I would suggest substituting it with a slightly sweetish white wine.
  • Chincho leaves - I think they will be impossible to get here. Seems they are related to huacatay and used to be used to treat malaria. I wonder if our friend can come up with a substitute.
  • Fava beans. Broad beans in pods are not often available, so most of the year, it would have to be frozen and I presume we should allow for that when giving a weight.


Thank you to our Peruvian visitor, Gloria Sebastiani for kindly providing this recipe

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