Steamed pork in a 5 spice cornmeal coating

From Cookipedia


This recipe needs advance preparation!
Steamed pork in a 5 spice cornmeal coating
Steamed pork in a 5 spice cornmeal coating
Servings:Serves 2
Calories per serving:321
Ready in:1 hour 10 minutes
Prep. time:40 minutes
Cook time:30 minutes
Difficulty:Average difficulty
Recipe author:Chef
First published:27th October 2012
Steaming 'pagoda'!
Shake the box, open the lid - all coated!
Pork slices, marinading in a Lock & Lock-type box

An interesting use for your steamer in my pork variation of Ken Hom's Xiao Long Yan Rou - Lamb steamed with spice-flavoured cornmeal from "The taste of China" ISBN 1 85813 149 9


Ingredients

Orange arrow.png Create a printable shopping list for this recipe's recipeIngredient

Method

  1. Add the cornmeal, 5 spice powder, ground peppercorns and salt to a bowl and put to one side.
  2. Cut the pork fillet into thin medallions, about 4 mm thick and add to a Lock & Lock-type container, together with the onions, ginger, garlic, soy, sherry and sesame oil. Close the lid and shake well to mix.
  3. Allow the flavours to combine for 30 minutes or so, add the cornmeal, close the lid and shake again to coat the meat evenly.
  4. Arrange everything on a plate that will fit in your steamer - ours is quite small so we used 2 plates on 2 levels.
  5. Add a few inches of boiling water to your steamer, return to the boil and stem the pork for 30 minutes - checking that the water does not dry out.

Serving suggestions

Serve immediately with plain boiled rice and a green vegetable.

Chef's notes

Follow the RSPCA Think Pig Checklist to make sure that your pork has come from pigs that have been reared to higher welfare standards.

Peeling ginger

There is no need to peel ginger. As a result of attending a Thai cookery demo, we have learnt that peeling ginger is unnecessary unless for aesthetic purposes as the skin is high in fibre and full of flavour. However, do remove any bits that have become tough or woody.

Graph your Body Mass Index

See your personal Body Mass Index (BMI) plotted on a graph against national averages.