Lambadi lamb curry

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Lambadi lamb curry
Lambadi lamb curry
Servings:Serves 4
Calories per serving:1010
Ready in:4 hours, 15 minutes
Prep. time:2 hours, 30 minutes
Cook time:1 hour, 45 minutes
Difficulty:Average difficulty
Recipe author:Chef
First published:6th April 2013
Marinade in the Lock and Lock box - showing the chile de arbole so you can get an idea of the size. They are pretty hot chillies

An interesting lamb curry originating from Rajasthan, North-west India.


Ingredients

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lamb marinade

Method

marinade

  1. To a lidded Lock and Lock box, add the yogurt and all the marinade ingredients.
  2. Ensure everything is evenly mixed.
  3. Add the meat. Close the lid and shake well. Refrigerate and leave to marinade for at least 2 hours, more if you have time. Shaking now and then ensures a constant marinade.

lamb curry

  1. Add the chilli paste and the ginger paste to a bowl or cup and mix with 4 tablespoons of water.
  2. Heat the ghee in a wok or large frying pan, add a good grind of black pepper. Once the pepper starts to fizz, stir in the onions, reduce the heat a little so the ghee does not burn and stir fry the onions for 10 minutes until nicely coloured.
  3. Add the ginger and garlic paste mix and the chilli power and mix well.
  4. Add the cardamom pods, and the cubed lamb with its marinade and stir fry for 5 minutes.
  5. Top up with 800 ml (1.25 pints) of vegetable stock.
  6. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 1 hour 30 minutes.

Serving suggestions

Serve with plain boiled rice and naan breads.

Chef's notes

I've changed the recipe quite a lot from the original. Originally it stated 10 g of dried chillies, crushed, in the marinade. That equates to about 45 birds' eye chillies. Too hot for me and I also have guests to consider. For the chilli marinade, I've used 10g (16 x dried chili de arbole, left whole. I've also used Ancho chili powder, which has a smokey hint. None of which is the least bit authentic, but should make an interesting curry.

The resulting curry was reasonably hot, (about Madras strength). If you want it hotter, I would suggest cutting the dried chillies in half. That will allow more of the heat and flavour to mingle with the sauce. If unsure, taste the sauce during cooking and if it starts to get too hot, remove some, or all of the chilles.

After the frying stage, I decided to use the slow cooker for the remaining cooking. As there was plenty of sauce, 2.5 hours on high made the lamb nice and tender, without overcooking.

If you want a more substantial sauce, stir in a few tablespoons of cornmeal 30 minutes before the ned of the cooking time.

Recipe source

  • Adapted from 'Gypsy meat' (Maas banjara) from Mr Pushpash Pent's wonderful "India": ISBN 978-0714859026.

Peeling ginger

There is no need to peel ginger. As a result of attending a Thai cookery demo, we have learnt that peeling ginger is unnecessary unless for aesthetic purposes as the skin is high in fibre and full of flavour. However, do remove any bits that have become tough or woody.

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