Spicy sorrel flavoured chicken

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Spicy sorrel flavoured chicken
Spicy sorrel flavoured chicken
Servings:Serves 4
Calories per serving:500
Ready in:1 hour, 45 minutes
Prep. time:45 minutes
Cook time:1 hour
Difficulty:Average difficulty
Recipe author:Chef
First published:13th November 2013
25 grams of sorrel leaves, larger stems trimmed

I've been looking for a recipe in which to use sorrel which we grow in our garden. It has a sharp lemony flavour, which until now I've only found useful in salads.

I found this Hyderabadi recipe in Mr Pushpash Pent's wonderful "India": ISBN 978-0714859026

I've adapted it very slightly to make it easier for me to replicate here in the UK.

The sorrel in the original recipe is gongura (''Hibiscus sabdariffa''), which is described as sour, so our English sorrel will probably be a reasonable substitute.


Ingredients

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Method

  1. Heat the ghee and oil in a heavy based pan or dutch oven over a medium heat.
  2. Gently stir-fry the onions for 8 minutes but don't let them colour
  3. Add the garlic and ginger and stir-fry for another few minutes
  4. Add the salt and the chicken pieces, reduce the heat to low, cover and cook for 40 minutes or until the chicken is properly cooked. Stir the chicken now and then. Don't worry that it will be too dry, the chicken released quite a lot of liquid so it eventually stews in it's own juices, so to speak.
  5. While the chicken is cooking, bring a small pan of water to the boil and add the green chillies and sorrel leaves and simmer for 2 minutes.
  6. Drain and allow to cool a little before blending to a paste in a feed processor or pestle and mortar - add a drop or two of the boiled water if the paste is too dry
  7. Add the remaining spices and poppy seed paste to the chicken and cook for 4 minutes
  8. Stir in the sorrel paste and cook for 2 minutes more.

Serving suggestions

Serve with plain rice, plain naan and a yogurt dip

Peeling ginger

There is no need to peel ginger. As a result of attending a Thai cookery demo, we have learnt that peeling ginger is unnecessary unless for aesthetic purposes as the skin is high in fibre and full of flavour. However, do remove any bits that have become tough or woody.

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