Salaisons fumées, marque nationale grand-duché de Luxembourg (Luxembourg smoked ham)

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Salaisons fumées, marque nationale grand-duché de Luxembourg

Salaisons fumées, marque nationale grand-duché de Luxembourg

Salaisons fumées, marque nationale grand-duché de Luxembourg is a IGP ham from Luxembourg. The legs of pork used in the manufacture of ham must be covered by the Luxembourg national brand for pig meat or an equivalent foreign designation. The ham differs from other hams in particular through its long curing period (at least 10 months). Due to this long period, to moderate curing and to a mixture obtained exclusively using the wood of broad-leaved trees, a typical taste and flavour develop which characterise Luxembourg ham. The hams are marketed as whole hams.

The quality and specific character are essentially due to the rigorous selection of the raw material and to the traditional method of manufacture, which is under State supervision. Over the years, these factors have led to a high reputation among consumers. The production area is the territory of the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg

Luxembourg is part of the French Moselle area where ham is traditionally cured and smoked in the form of whole ham comprising the knuckle and bones. The designation "Salaisons fumées de la Marque Nationale Luxembourgeoises" was created by the amended Regulation of the Government in Council of 9 February 1990 creating a national brand for smoked cured meat and laying down the conditions for the award of this brand, and by the Ministerial Regulation of 7 March 1990 laying down certain detailed rules of application . The product is obtained by a non-industrial method; there are some 20 butchers/pork butchers who have undertaken to comply with the requirements of the legislative texts. Ten months after the curing date, the hams are examined by an inspector and, before being placed on the market, are branded with a special stamp. Curing takes place throughout the year, although to a greater extent during the autumn and winter months.

Reference:The European Commission