Eel

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The European eel

True eels are elongated fishes, ranging in length from 5 centimetres (2.0 in) in the one-jawed eel to 3.75 metres (12.3 ft) in the giant moray. They have no pelvic fins, and many species also lack pectoral fins. The dorsal and anal fins are fused with the caudal or tail fin, to form a single ribbon running along much of the length of the animal.

Culinary uses

The European eel and other freshwater eels are eaten in Europe, the United States, and other places around the world. A traditional East London food is jellied eels. The Basque delicacy angulas consists of deep-fried elver (young eels).

Freshwater eels (unagi) and marine eels (conger eel, anago) are commonly used in Japanese, Chinese and Korean cuisine. In New Zealand longfin eel is a traditional food for Māori.


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