Baharat

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Baharat
Baharat
Baharat in a large airtight container
Servings:Serves 20 - Makes a small jar of baharat
Calories per serving:0
Ready in:15 minutes
Prep. time:15 minutes
Cook time:None
Difficulty:Difficult
Recipe author:JuliaBalbilla
First published:24th October 2012
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Typical baharat ingredients

Bahārāt is a spice mixture or blend used throughout the Levant, in Lebanese, Syrian, Jordanian, Iraqi, Libyan and Palestinian cuisine. Baharat, in Arabic, means "spices". The name originated in Medieval India, as Bhārat, a Sanskrit name for India, was the source of these spices. The mixture of finely ground spices is often used to season lamb, fish, chicken, beef, and soups. Additionally, it may be used as a condiment, to add more flavour after a meal has been prepared.

Unless you are going to use tons of the stuff, assume half or even a quarter of a teaspoon for one part

Ingredients

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Method

  1. Grind all of the ingredients to a fine powder in a spice mill or coffee grinder.
  2. Dried and pulverised kaffir lime leaves can also be added to taste.
  3. The mixture can be rubbed into meat or mixed with olive oil and lime juice to form a marinade.

Variations

Possible ingredients may be: Allspice Black peppercorns Cardamom seeds Cassia bark Cloves Coriander seeds Cumin seeds Nutmeg Dried red chili peppers or paprika Turkish baharat includes mint as a key ingredient. In Tunisia, bharat refers to a simple mixture of dried rosebuds and ground cinnamon, often combined with black pepper. In the Gulf States, loomi (dried black lime) and saffron may also be used for the kebsa spice mixture (also called "Gulf baharat").

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