Feijoada

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Feijoada

Feijoada is a stew of black beans with beef and/or pork meats, which is a typical Portuguese dish, also typical in Brazil, Angola and other former Portuguese colonies. In Brazil, feijoada is considered the national dish, which was brought to South America by the Portuguese, based in ancient Feijoada recipes from the Portuguese regions of Beira, Estremadura and Trás-os-Montes.

Recipe

The Brazilian feijoada is prepared with black turtle beans, with a variety of salted pork and beef products such as salted pork trimmings (ears, tail, feet), bacon, smoked pork ribs, at least two types of smoked sausage and jerked beef (loin and tongue).

The recipe has many similarities with other rice/bean stews such as hoppin' John and Platillo Moros y Cristianos.

This stew is best prepared over slow fire in a thick clay pot. The final dish has the beans and meat pieces barely covered by a dark purplish-brown broth. The taste is strong, moderately salty but not spicy, dominated by the flavours of black bean and meat stew.

Side dishes

In Brazil, feijoada is traditionally served with rice, and accompanied by chopped refried collard greens, lightly roasted coarse cassava flour (farofa) and a peeled and sliced orange. Other common side dishes are boiled or deep-fried cassava, deep-fried bananas, and pork rinds (torresmo). A pot of hot pepper sauce is often provided on the side. The meal is often washed down with cachaça, caipirinha or beer.

Tradition

Since it is a rather heavy dish that takes several hours to cook, feijoada is consumed in Brazil only occasionally, always at lunch time. Traditionally restaurants will offer it as the "daily's special" only once or twice a week, usually on Wednesdays, Saturdays, or sometimes on Sundays.


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